Pet Dwelling

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2 days 19 hours ago

Dear Pet Dwelling members,

We have added a new privacy setting function for owner info. Now you can choose your contact info to be Public or Only me.

Set Owner info "Public": Anyone accessed your profile can see your owner info.

Set Owner info "Only Me": You are only able to see the owner info when you log in.

At Pet Dwelling, we always looking for improvements to provide our members quality product, wonderful user experience and secure virtual environment. We appreciate you being a part of the Pet Dwelling community. Please fee free to contact us if you have any questions or feedbacks.

Happy Holidays!
Pet dwelling Team Support

5 days 7 hours ago

Pet Dwelling QR tag makes your pet look classy and even cuter! Purchase your choices of Pet tags now:

www.petdwelling.com/store

5 days 18 hours ago

Tip of the week:

How to Create PetDwelling.com shortcut on Your Home Screen.

6 days 21 hours ago

A Scottish Deerhound named Claire was crowned the Best in Show winner at the 2021 National Dog Show -- the first dog to ever do so in the show's 20-year history.

Read full story at:
https://nypost.com/2021/11/25/best-in-show-winner-at-2021-national-dog-s...

1 week 1 day ago

Happy Thanksgiving to Pet Dwelling Community!

1 week 2 days ago

Dear member,

It's normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects as they explore the world. For young dogs, it's a way to relieve pain that might be caused by incoming teeth. For older dogs, it's nature's way of keeping jaws strong and teeth clean. Chewing also combats boredom and can relieve mild anxiety or frustration.

Chewing is also good for your dog’s mental and physical health, so it’s important that you provide them with plenty of safe and appropriate things to chew on. Fail to do so and they’ll come up with their own chew “toys,” like your most expensive pair of shoes, the legs of your dining room chairs, the nearest electric cord, or even your arm!

The bite force of average dogs ranges somewhere around 230-300 psi, but some are able to reach over 700psi . Even though nowhere as strong as a Nile Crocodile's bite, the force of a strong dog's bite won't only rip through flesh, but it could also break bones and damage metals.

Therefore, you should always attach your pet ID tag onto the collar rigorously and compactly to avoid the tag hanging on the floor and to prevent dog bite or chewing on the ID tag. Don't let your ID tag become one of their chewing toys.

Hope this information helps. Please view detail story on Inside DogsWorld: https://www.insidedogsworld.com/dog-bite-explained-top-20-dogs-with-the-...

Sincerely,
Pet Dwelling Support

1 week 6 days ago

Tip of the Week: Interact with nearby pet owners

[image of where 'Nearby' section is]

See who's in your area in the 'Nearby' section. This shows you other members that are in the same 'City or Town' as you. You can 'follow' them for their updates or set up a playdate and meet up!

2 weeks 2 days ago

Price Alerts!!!

Due to the costs increase in the holiday season. All Pet Dwelling Tags will increase 25-40% starting December 1st. If you want to send Pet Dwelling tags for gift, please order you tags from www.petdwelling.com/store before then. Thank you for your support and cooperation!

Sincerely,
Pet Dwelling Store

2 weeks 5 days ago

Tips of the week: Multiple tags for one pet

Winter is here, preparing multiple tags for your pet will make changing your pet collars convenient and safe outdoors. Pet Dwelling allows multiple tags for one pet profile. All you have to do is Activate New Tags on your pet's profile page, it's that simple. Now you don't have to take your tag on and off when you change collars for your pet.

2 weeks 6 days ago

Emotional Support Animal Laws

Emotional Support Animal Access To Public Places
Emotional support animals do not have the same legal rights as service dogs. As mentioned before, service dogs are protected by the ADA. The broad public access rights for assistance animals under the ADA only extend to service dogs that are individually trained to perform tasks to benefit an individual with a disability.

Due to this distinction, your emotional support animal is not protected by the ADA. Service dogs are allowed access to all public places such as stores, movie theaters, hospitals, and restaurants. On the other hand, emotional support animals are allowed access only to residences (including buildings with no-pet policies) and on select airlines. Please keep in mind that although ESAs do not need any special training, they still need to be well behaved and should have the ability to follow basic commands.

What Laws Protect Emotional Support Animals?
Although emotional support animals do not have the same access rights as service dogs under ADA, they are protected under the Fair Housing Act (FHA). If you meet the criteria for ESA qualification under the FHA, you are entitled to live with your emotional support animal free of charge and deposits, even if your building doesn’t allow pets. The FHA also prevents housing providers from imposing breed and weight restrictions on your ESA. Many state laws mostly mirror the FHA, which provides additional protection against discrimination for ESA owners. Housing providers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for ESA owners so they can have equal opportunity to use and enjoy their residence.

Until recently, emotional support animals also enjoyed the right to fly with their ESA in the cabin under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA). However, due to regulatory changes that went into effect in January 2021, airlines are no longer required to accommodate emotional support animals (although a few airlines still have programs to allow them). However, psychiatric service dogs (PSDs) are still allowed to fly on planes, free of charge. A PSD is a type of service dog that performs tasks relating to an owner’s psychological or intellectual disability. Under the ADA and ACAA, PSDs have the same rights as service dogs that perform tasks for the physically disabled. To learn more about how to fly with a psychiatric service dog, please click on this link for a complete guide.
Emotional Support Animal Access To Public Places
Emotional support animals do not have the same legal rights as service dogs. As mentioned before, service dogs are protected by the ADA. The broad public access rights for assistance animals under the ADA only extend to service dogs that are individually trained to perform tasks to benefit an individual with a disability.

Due to this distinction, your emotional support animal is not protected by the ADA. Service dogs are allowed access to all public places such as stores, movie theaters, hospitals, and restaurants. On the other hand, emotional support animals are allowed access only to residences (including buildings with no-pet policies) and on select airlines. Please keep in mind that although ESAs do not need any special training, they still need to be well behaved and should have the ability to follow basic commands.

What Laws Protect Emotional Support Animals?
Although emotional support animals do not have the same access rights as service dogs under ADA, they are protected under the Fair Housing Act (FHA). If you meet the criteria for ESA qualification under the FHA, you are entitled to live with your emotional support animal free of charge and deposits, even if your building doesn’t allow pets. The FHA also prevents housing providers from imposing breed and weight restrictions on your ESA. Many state laws mostly mirror the FHA, which provides additional protection against discrimination for ESA owners. Housing providers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for ESA owners so they can have equal opportunity to use and enjoy their residence.

Until recently, emotional support animals also enjoyed the right to fly with their ESA in the cabin under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA). However, due to regulatory changes that went into effect in January 2021, airlines are no longer required to accommodate emotional support animals (although a few airlines still have programs to allow them). However, psychiatric service dogs (PSDs) are still allowed to fly on planes, free of charge. A PSD is a type of service dog that performs tasks relating to an owner’s psychological or intellectual disability. Under the ADA and ACAA, PSDs have the same rights as service dogs that perform tasks for the physically disabled. To learn more about how to fly with a psychiatric service dog, please click on this link for a complete guide.

Read more at https://www.servicedogcertifications.org/emotional-support-animal-laws/